Agrodiversity in Development

This project aims to assess traditional knowledge and resilience of agriculture and develop alternative options in adapting to climate and ecosystem changes through research on agrodiversity to maintain sustainable agriculture and its multiple functions and secure local livelihoods for sustainable development.

Agrodiversity are many and dynamic ways in which farmers use the natural diversity of the environment for livelihoods, including not only choice of crops but also management of land, water and biota as a whole. Agrodiversity integrates biological, technological and institutional components that offer flexibility and resilience to local farmers in developing innovative strategies to adapt to climate and ecosystem change for sustainable development.

Building on the past experience of UNU, the Agrodiversity in Development research will be focused on potential of agrodiversity in traditional agriculture, forest and dryland management to address challenges in global sustainable development. The purpose of Agrodiversity in Development project is to enhance research on agrodiversity to contribute to maintaining sustainable agriculture and its multiple functions in adaptation to climate and ecosystems changes so as to secure local livelihoods for sustainable development.

Shifting agriculture in Northern Laos. Photo: UNU-ISP

The project consists of three major components:

  1. Agricultural Heritage Systems
  2. Sustainable Forestry
  3. Joint Postgraduate Programme in Integrated Dryland Management

The project outputs will include assessing ingenious traditional agricultural systems and giving guidance to policy makers and stakeholders in their application to and conservation of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems(GIAHS), documentation of best practices in sustainable forest management and rehabilitation, training of postgraduate students in dryland management and strengthening local capacities in mitigating and adapting to climate and ecosystem change for sustainable development.

Rice fields, home gardens and forests in Sri Lanka. Photo: UNU-ISP

 

 

 

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